The 60's

  • the Guess Who "These Eyes"

    I wanted to start this post by saying I"m sorry I"ve been absent from posting in this blog. I've been busy with other original music projects and I"m also in the middle of producing my podcast which will be similiar to this blog. now once that is up and running and is on iTunes I will be posting in this blog a lot less but until then I will keep posting in this blog whenever I can. but I wanted to share this song with you because out of all of the songs I grew up listening to from the 60's as a kid, this one was probably the only song that I distincly remember the first time I heard it. I can remember exactly where I was and who I was with when I first heard this song on the radio. Lol I sound like a Baby boomer even though I'm 22 but I grew up with this music as a kid just as much as someone who was a kid in the 60's except I'm a millenial and not a baby boomer. but anyways, when I was a kid, I used to hang out with this girl and her mom served as my babysitter when I was a kid. I spent many weekends sleeping over at her place and I spent a lot of time with her as a kid even though at the time i was too young to know anything about sex or romance. basically what I"m leading up to is that when I first heard this song, it was super late at night and me and her went to the Fairplex in Pomona and at around 10pm at night when we were on our way home it was pitch black outside and this song came on the radio. now at the time I didn't know who did the song or anything about the artist that did it but I did fall in love with it and this was also one of the songs that kick started my love and desire to learn more about 60's music. and also, let's talk about how great the song and the band is. first of all the lyrics in this song are just poetically beautiful and are just drop dead georgous. I mean you really do feel for the lead singer in this particular song and how much pain he feels after his girlfriend treated him like shit I mean with lyrics like "these eyes watched you bring my world to an end this heart will not accept and pretend" you can tell that he meant every single word he said. and another really cool aspect about this song is that the upwards modulation of the hook. it creates dramatic tension and really gives this song an extra umph that really packs a punch. and also, this group was in Fact Canadian and arguably the first really commercially successful Canadian Band pre dating Rush by many years. on this you had Burton Cummings on lead vocals and Electric Piano, Randy Bachman on guitar, Jim Kale on bass and Gary Peterson on drums. Bachman would later go on to form BTO after he left this band and when this song was written one of them was still living with their parents and they had not had a really big hit yet and when they came up with this song, one of them was sitting next to a piano about to go on a date with a girl and this song was written while she was getting ready in another room. one of them played the riff on the piano and the song pretty much wrote itself. it became their first Top 10 hit in America and it changed their lives forever. one thing I will say about this band is that not only were they the first Canadian band to have a number 1 record in America but each and every single one of their hits sounds completely different in so many ways. they definitley were not one of those groups where all of their songs sounded similiar to each other. i highly reccomend listening to their other songs like No Sugar Tonight, Laughing and Undun and No Time and of course, their biggest American hit, American Woman, which sounds like a complete and total 180 from this song in terms of genre and instrumentaiton and harmony as well.

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  • The Hollies "Stop Stop Stop"

    this was a very strange record for this group but it really was a fascinating song and arrangement for various reasons that I'll talk about in this 60's Music Blog post but for starters, where in terms of British Invasion Pop records do you hear banjos? I mean I can only think of one other record from the British Invasion where the prominet instrument was the Banjo (Lady Godiva by Peter and Gordon) but other then that records that have a banjo as the main instrument even in America in this era of popular music were hard to come by but not only that but the lead guitar player in this group (Tony Hicks) managed to make the banjo sound like a Middle Eastern instrument very similar to the citar, mainly because it has this very droning quality to it probably because the song's harmony is based off of a very droning chord (the D dominant 7th chord). and really what this song is about is something that definitely no kids should hear because the subject matter of this song and the story it tells is very X rated for popular music of this time. the song starts out with a guy walking into a strip club and him encountering a belly dancer and basically the whole song is about his one to one face to face encounter with this belly dancer and she is described in almost expclicit detail in this song but not explicit enough for it to get banned by several Top 40 Am radio stations in the US. the song details's the singer's reaction to the dancer and the minute he tries to make physical contact with the girl and tries to make a move on her they spill a bunch of drinks and he gets thrown out of the club and into the streets. Obviously you would think a song about a belly dancer/stripper would get banned from several radio stations given the time and decade this record came out in but I guess the FCC censors cut a little loose and decided to let this one slide and not ban it from any Radio stations. but now that I have my own personal analysis of this song out of the way, let's talk about the band that did this song. the Hollies. man were they a very talented group. I mean not only was Tony Hicks a highly underrated lead guitar player but the group's harmonies were excellent and very up to par and much better then the other British Invasion groups at the time. I mean when you listen to their harmonies you won't be able to mistake them for any other British Invasion group. and on top of that they were also singed to the Same Label as the Beatles (Parlaphone records) in fact the Beatles sighted the Hollies as an influence on one of their tracks off of Revolver (If I Needed Someone) but unfortunately what happened with this particular group is that even though they had hits in England as early as 1963 they became very late in the game in terms of having mega hits in America. their first Top 40 hit in America came in late 1965 but then their second hit and their first Top 10 came out in Late Spring early Summer of 1966 and this was their third hit single. A very good original track that was entirely written based off of real experience. Morris Levy took them to a Strip Club in New York City and they have previously never been to one since they really didn't have any in their home country at the Time (the UK) and they wrote this song based off of that experience. and one of the memebers of this group later went on to have mega success with arguably the first super group. Crosby Stills and Nash (I'm talking about no other then Graham Nash) their first two hit singles were written by Graham Gouldman who later went on to form 10cc in the 70's, a very successful pop group in the 70's.

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  • the Chantays "Pipeline"

    Surf Rock was in fact an actual genre of music that was very prominent in the early 60's in the Pre Beatles America. there were many different Surf Rock bands and many of them were from Southern California but very few of them could break out on the charts nationally. and most of the ones that could (with pretty much the only exception being the Ventures, but they weren't even from Southern California but that's besides the point) ultimately wound up being one hit wonders and this band unfortunately wound up being a one hit wonder, but man what an incredible one hit this group was able to have. I mean this record like I say in other posts in this blog is very interesting to me. because it really is the quintessential Surf Rock instrumental record from this era because it has all of the ingredients for it. it was originally recorded in stereo (which basically means there were instruments coming from two speakers a bunch of instruments coming out of the left speaker and a bunch coming from the right speaker) and all of the electric guitars were drenched in Reverb which is an essential ingredient to Surf Rock and to me it sounds like they used the typical guitars that were a typical of Surf Rock back then (Fender Jazzmasters and Jaguars) and not only that but this record was also mixed backwards with the rhythm guitar and electric piano (which I believe was a Wurtlizer on this record) and bass are at the forefront of the mix and while the lead guitar and drums are mixed further back which makes it a very interesting record to listen to especially with good speakers/monitors but overall the strcuture of the song is great because it essenitally pretty much only has a A and a B section which is fine for a Surf Rock instrumental. but really when you listen to this record, surfing a long a Pipeline automatically pops up and that's what makes it such a great record. and anyways, this band was originally from Orange County and they consisted of Brian Carmen, Bob Spickard, Bob Welch, Warren Waters, and Rob Marshall and this record was recorded in a back of a record shop in Downey California and was originally called Liberty's Whip but then the co composer (Brian Carmen) changed the song's name to Pipeline after seeing a surfing movie with a Surfer Surfing to the Hawaiian Banzai Pipeline. it was released in Late 1962 and charted on Billboard in the early months of 1963 (Like Late Jan early Feburary). to conclude this blog post, Surf Rock was mainly an instrumental genre of music until the Beach Boys added lyrics and melodies to surf songs even though only one true original memebr of the band  was a surfer.

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  • the Dave Clark Five "Bits and Pieces"

    in terms of British Invasion Music, there were very few bands in the mid 60's that could successfully compete with the big 4 (aka the Beatles) and few didn't really have the longevity that the Beatles had in order to last past the 60's with very few excpetions (those being the Hollies and the Rolling Stones) but there were some groups that in that moment in 1964 were at one point very good contenders as to who could compete with the Fab Four. those groups included Herman's Hermits, and this band, the Dave Clark Five. In fact in 1964, there were arguments in schools in America and in England amoungst the girls who were like "who was better the Dave Clark Five or the Beatles"? Now one would manage to reinvent themselves in the late 60's and expand their horizons by doing more experimental and deep and emotional songs and was able to succesfully weasel themsevles out of the singles market and into the albums market while one mainly just stuck with their signature sound and was never able to expand outside of that and ran out of steam by the end of 1967 and didn't have any more hits in America where as the other was still very much going strong by the end of the 60's right up until the beginning of the 70's is when things started to splinter for them. but anyways, this blog post is not about the Beatles but it's about the next best thing to them, the Dave Clark Five and specifically this song. man is this a great track. I mean this band was fantastic at putting out loud and humongous singles where they sounded like they doubles and tripled their voices to make their records sound huge and those footstomps and Dennis Payton's roaring bari sax makes this record even louder and even more bad ass. and I bet you any money that when they originally recorded these songs, they pushed the limiters to their peak and there were some major tape distortion on all of the tracks including their lead vocals but Tape distortion can actually sound pretty good unlike digital distortion. and not only that but this band basically came on to the Charts right on the Heals of the Beatles with their first big American hit being released in Feb of 1964 when Beatlemaina was taking over the charts at the time. but anyways, just some things about the band so that way whoever is reading this knows more about the group then by just listening to their music. the DC5 in a nutshell was pretty much a business venture for Dave Clark since he owned and controlled the group's finances (which included their publishing and their masters) and basically paid the rest of the members of the band a weekly salary and treated them very much like hired guns and not as equal band members in a democratic situation where the rest of the band had an equal share in the publishing and mechanical royalties. and also, not only did Dave Clark Not play drums on their big hit singles (Bobby Graham did that) but he also would not allow any American record company to license the group's catalouge for American Distribution in CD Compilations after the group's heyday was over. so because of that, the Band's music was widely unavailable to purchase in America for Years and even though the bulk of the band's original material was credited to Dave Clark and Mike Smith, neither of them actually wrote any of the band's original songs. Ron Ryan actually was the one who wrote the bulk of the band's original Material including this song and Glad All over and Catch Us if You Can and Because. Unfortunately what happened with him was that when the band got singed to Epic Records, Dave Clark was searching for a songwriter to write songs for the band and he was able to find him but what happened was that he found Ron Ryan and was unfortunately dumb enough to allow Clark to take credit for the band's original material and because of that, Ryan did not earn a cent in terms of the publishing or writer's royalties on anything he wrote for the group and all of the songs he wrote for the band, all of the publishin money went to Dave Clark and he didn't even share it with the rest of the band. in a nutshell, even though the band's history wasn't that great, I still think their music kicks ass and still sounds awesome to this day even though their music is well over 50 years old.

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  • the Byrds "Eight Miles High"

    there are many songs from this particular era of music that I've always gravitated towards too (the 60's) that I don't really rememeber hearing growing up listening to Oldies Radio when I was younger (K earth 101) and the first time I heard them I didn't really like it at first but it took time for me to grow an appreciation for the record and it's historical significance, and this is one of those songs that I never heard growing up in LA listening to Oldies Radio and the first time I heard it I wasn't particulary a huge fan of it I was so used to hearing the band's other songs that are honestly the complete polar opposite of this particular song (Turn Turn Turn and Mr Tamborine Man, just a few examples) It was just too werid for me to be able to sink my teeth into it the firs time I heard it but I've always heard of the song (at least the title of it) but I never actually got to hear the song until I sampled it on iTunes. but later one as I learned more and more about it, the record all of a sudden became interesting to me because the story behind it and the cultural signficance of it seemed to have fascinated me and that's why I chose it for this edition of the 60's music Blog. but really, let's talk about the back story behind this record and how the song was written and what was the historical importance of it. first of all, it all started when the Byrds made their first international Tour in the UK and Gene Clark decides to write a song about the whole experiecne they were having while on that tour. and it all started when they were six miles high up from the ground about to touch down on the plane they were flying on to get to England, now Gene decided to change the name from the song to "Six Miles High" to "Eight Miles High" as a reference to the Beatles song "Eight Days A Week" and Eight just sounded better to him but the title of the song actually wasn't a reference to how high on drugs they were at the time even though the song was partially inspired by Drugs. and most of the lyrics in the song were references to their first UK tour Such as "lain gray town known for it's sound and people so afraid of loosing their ground" in a sense was a reference to all of the chaos of all of the screaming girls they ran into when they first arrived and how another band from the UK with the same name but different spelling Sued them unsuccesfully for stealing their name without their permission. and on top of their interesting experience of touring the UK for the first time, Roger McGuinn at the time was also heavily influenced by sitar player Ravi Shankar and Jazz sax player John Coltrane. at the time he owned albums by both of those artists and that greatly influenced his psychedelic lead playing in the song and this song also got banned from several radio stations due to the drug infused nature of the lyrics in the song which explained why it missed the Top 10 but it still surprisingly made Top 40, cause it sure does not sound like a hit record to me. it sounded more like an Album Cut or a Non Hit single. the song is credited to the three main guys in the band, Gene Clark and Roger McGuinn and David Crosby and Gene Clark left the band shorty after this song was recorded so most performance footage that exists of this band doing the song is featured without him.

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  • The Turtles "You Baby"

    do you ever listen to a song and it's so infections and catchy that you just can't help but fall in love with it from the first time you hear it? well this is just one of those songs that will have you singing along with the lyric and melody right from the first time you hear it. I mean just the way the song is structured from the verses revolving around the hook of the song (You Baby) and the pre choruses building right to the Hook (You Baby) really makes this song an incredibly crafted pop song of it's era. the only thing that's not so great about this record is the somewhat pointless bridge where the writer goes a little off topic where he says a little ray of sunshine a little bit of soul and just a touch of magic, you've got the greatest thing since Rock and Roll, but then he leads straight into the last chorus when he reveal's that he's talking about his girl (You Baby) this is one of those songs that you can definitely tell it will pretty much live on forever because of how timeless the lyrics are and just how catchy and sing-alongable the lyric and melody are. but now that my personal opinion is out the way, let's talk about the guy that wrote the song, he was a local songwriter signed to ABC Dunhil in the 60's named PF Sloan. PF Sloan is a name you probably won't recognize but he was responsible for some of the most enduring Southern California Classics of the 60's (Secret Agent Man and Eve of Destruction just to name a few) him a long with Jimmy Webb became one of the most prominent songwriters to come out of California in the 60's a long with Brian Wilson. now what was so interesting about PF sloan is that he was also signed as an artist to a small label in the late 50's and cut some sides under a different name but those singles went nowhere due to lack of promotion from the label he was signed to. he had his First Hot 100 hit as a songwriter in 1964 with a song by a Chubby Checker sound a like named Round Robin. the song was called Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann, during that time he got signed to ABC Dunhil records as a staff writer a long with his partner Steve Barri, and there is where he was able to write some hit songs for people like Herman's Hermits and Johnny Rivers and Barry Mcguire and the Turtles. I actually got to meet and watch an intervirew with PF Sloan and he said in the interview that he originally intended this song for the Vogues, a new Vocal group at the time to Record it (and they actually did wound up recording it but they never released it) and then the original Sloan Barri Demo of this song somehow found it's way to the Turtles and they decided to record it and it became their third consecutive Top 40 hit as a band after it Ain't Me Babe and Let Me Be (another Sloan Barri Composition) PF sloan was also one of those songwriter that made several unsuccessful attempts of being a solo artist by cutting original songs he's singing lead on under several different names (one of them being the Fantastic Baggys) one of those groups was a group that would later on have success in their own right as the Grass Roots that band originally was just a project name for singles written and sung by Pf Sloan and Steve Barri but their label ABC Dunhill would not allow them to release it under their own name so they came up with the Grass Roots Moniker but they wouldn't even let them tour or promote the hit single so that resulted in them getting two groups to tour under the name the Grass Roots the first incarnation wasn't successful, the next incarnation became way more successful and the band that would go on to sing on such hits such as Let's Live For Today and Midnight Confessions and I'd Wait a Million Years. Long Story Short, PF sloan Died went into complete obscurity after writing those hit songs and after being fired as a staff writer for ABC Dunhill and was able to put out an auto biography later on in his life but then he died a few years back and I was happy to get the chance to meet and talk to him briefly. he was such a nice guy with a very theatrical voice. his music will live on forever.

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  • the Lovin Spoonful "Summer in the City"

    there are some records that the best way word to use to describe them to you is pure awesomeness and it doesn't get anymore awesome then this record right here folks. Summer in the City is one of those songs that just has an incredible production on it. I mean everything about it is just incredibly top knotch and professional and the best of the best up until that point. but what really makes this record so good are two main characteristics of it:the electric piano (Played by Artie Schrorek) and the sound effects on the record, i mean right from the very beginning when the piano and the drums kick in where the drummer does a single note figure an the piano player does a double note figure and it's all done so dramatically that it really hooks you in within the first couple seconds of the song, and also, the way John Sebastain sings this song, he does it in a way that it sounds like he is trying to pioneer rap by trying to cram in a bunch of words into a limited note melody to the point where you really have to listen closly to try to figure out what he is saying, but really what's so ingenuis about this record is it's lyrics, I mean it doesn't get more epic then in the chorus where they are "but at night it's a different world go out and find a girl come on come on and dance all night despite the heat you'll be alright" I mean what other lyrics perfectly describe the atmosphere of being in a city during the summertime then that? yeah I don't think there's anymore lyrics that acurately nail that better then the lyrics in this song and also, this uses just the right amount of sound effects of car horns honking on a busy street to make it sound authentic and I love it when the guitar and the piano double each other for this section and then the electic piano and organ kick back in and the song goes back into it's main seciton again. but really the genius behind this song are John Sebastian, and his brother Mark and Steve Boone, the writing team behind this song and Eric Jacobson their producer, this song started out as a poem by John's brother Mark as a homework assingement by him when he was in college that was later turned into a song thanks to him and Steve and they recorded it in two days, one day they did all of the instrumentation and next day they did the vocals and sound effects.

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  • Gary Lewis and the Playboys "Everybody Loves A Clown"

    for this music blog I tend to pick songs that have a very interesting angle about them lyrically but not always musically. this song on the other hand is super interesting in my opinion because it takes up an interesting angle in a traditional pop love song. basically what's happening in this song is the singer is talking about how most people love clowns but the girl he is interested in doesn't like clowns at all. in fact, she is scared of clowns and every time she sees the singer who is a clown, she takes off and leaves when everybody else laughs, and he jokes around at a party while she's there, she doesn't laugh or looks and she just doesn't care, the singer is confused as to why the girl isn't really that interested in him and his antics to the point that it's really making him sad, but he gives the girl a little perspective as to what it's like to be in his shoes by saying it's really not easy to be a clown and be in love with her when she doesn't return the same feelings for him. in fact, in the final verse of the song, we find out that the singer really has no interest in being a clown and is frustrated that the girl he's interested can't seem to understand or see the whole other side of him that's a lot darker then just him being super happy as a clown. the song concludes with the singer who imagines himself pretending to be the clown with a broken heart and then lastly, he begins to think that the girl she's talking to has big dreams of falling in love with a guy but does not even know where to begin as to how she can go about finding that and to start doing that. but what's interesting about this song is that it's sad but the loose ends are not tightened at the end and the ending is not very happy and extremely open ended which makes this song very interesting. and not only that but the production on this track is very much top notch for records of this era from doubled guitar and orchestral chimes in the bridge to a very up front harpsichord throughout the whole record and Gary's doubled lead vocals. and what's also surprising about this record is a lot along with the Wrecking Crew, memebers of the Playboys are also playing on this which included Tommy Tripplehorn and Carl Radle, and David Costell and John West and David Walker a long with memebrs of the Wrecking Crew including Hal Blaine and Tommy Tedesco and Ray Pohlman and Bill Pitman and of course, the head arranger and producer Leon Russell who not only did the Arrangement but also played Harpsichord on this record and many other Playboys songs. this song was cut at United Western Recorders on Sunset Boulevard and was cut on June 3rd, 1965

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  • Peter and Gordon "I Go to Pieces"

    there's a reason why I always will and keep coming back to 60's music. I don't care if I"m 89 years old I will still have just a strong of a passion and love for this decade of music as I do right now at 22 years old. I might not be able to relate to and connect with each song from this era in terms of the lyrics but that does not take away at all from my passion and love for it. Now this song, I can't even begin to tell you how many times I have heard this song. and trust me, I've heard it over a MILLION times, but after not hearing it for a while, I have to hear it again. it really is one of those songs I tend to gravitate two because of it's pure raw emotion in the lyrics and the chord structure in the song. it utilizes my favorite chords of all time. the minor 3 and the minor 2 chord, and those chords perfectly fit with what's happening in the lyrics. and really it's what's happening in the lyrics that intrique me about this song. right from the very first verse, as soon as he see his ex girlfriend, he can't get his eyes off of her and he becomes weak and vulnerable. he tries to let his arms know to hold someone knew but they don't seem to listen or care. and things get very interesting in the bridge when he all of the sudden turns back the clock and goes back to the moment when his girlfriend said goodbye to him, and things all of a sudden go from third to first person. it seems as if the girl leaves things with him opened ended by saing "we'll meet again soon maybe" but then she quickly closes things off by saying "but until we do all my best to you" and then things quickly go back to the guy being lonely missing his ex, but it's curious as to why he actually misses her because at the last part of the last verse, he says "she hurt me so much inside now I know she's satisfied" I don't know why he misses her and wants to come back to her when she hurt him deep inside. that I"ll probably never know but this song is such a great example of fantastic songwriting. from the switch to third to first person to an amazing hook, definitley a greta record. but what also makes this song interested is the story behind. it. it was written by an American Singer Songwriter named Del Shannon who has had hits with songs such as "Runaway" and "Hats Off to Larry" and "Little Town Flirt"  and he tried to record this song with an artist he was producing at the time he wrote it named Lloyd Brown. when he did that, he shopped the recording around to various different record labels in New York, none of them were interested in putting out the single so he recorded it himself in Mira Sound Studios but was unable to throw down a satisfactory vocal for the song. so he decided since he can't sing the song himself, he would give it somebody else, at the time he had just scored a really big hit despite the onslaught of the the British Invasion called "Keep Searching Will Follow the Sun" and that allowed him to tour worldwide again and share the stages with other popular british Invasion bands. the story goes he was put on the bill with two really huge British Invasion groups. the Searchers and this duo named Peter and Gordon. it was then that he pitched this song to the Searchers and they were not interested in recording it at all, but then Peter and Gordon who were apart of the same show overheard that song and fell in love with it. they gladly asked Del's permission to record hit. he gave them the green light to record it and sooner then later, the duo came back to England and took this song with them for a recording session at Abbey Road Studios produced by John Bugress and Arranged by Geoff Love. Eddie King their guitar tech can also be heard playing the 12 string guitar along with their guitar playing on this record. it was released in Dec. of 1964 in America, and a month earlier in their home country the UK, and it became the 4th consecutive Top 40 hit in America after A World Without Love, I Don't Want To See You Again and Nobody I Know. it also was the first hit they had that was not written by John Lennon or Paul McCarntney of the Beatles. Peter Asher later went on to become a successful A&R Man for Warner Brothers Records producing the likes of Linda Rodstat or James Taylor in the 70's but that's another story.

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  • The Searchers "Love Potion Number 9"

    This song has always been really fascinating to me for several reasons. it's plot can be extended and embellished into a major motion picture, but really this song is just one of those I always had a clear memory of even as a child but for the longest time did not know who the band was who did it or who wrote the song, but as soon as I found that out, I was just fascinated by the song's history. but let's just start with the song's lyrical content, it starts with a guy who keeps failing with girls and is desperately looking for some kind of cure to get him to have more success with the ladies, so he goes to this gypsy named Madam Ruth who happens to have this "gold cap tooth" in her mouth and her place is located on the intersection of 34th/Vine (and by the way there is no such intersection as 34th/Vine, at least in Los Angeles) and when gets there, he finds out that she has seven little bottles of this chemicle known as "love potion Number 9" and that's exactly what she pescribes to him after he lets her know what his issues with girls are and then what really makes the song interesting is that he goes into describing what the potion smells and looks like (specifically Turmpen Thyme and Indian ink) and then he proceeds to having a sample of this love potion and what happens is that his vision goes completely down the drain and can't tell if it's day or night and he starts kissing everything in sight but as soon as he kisses a cop in the same intersection where the gypsey was located in (34th/Vine) the bottle of Love Potion Number 9 gets broken but what's really interesting about this song is that yes it's about love but there is no one specific girl involved and the main subject in the song is not a girl or a romatic relationship but a bottle of chemicles which I firmly believe did not fix his girl problems but still made the song fun and entertaining nonetheless. it kind of follows the old cliche of the guy going to go see a fortune teller or a love guru looking for solution for his problems but instead finding something else entirely different then that. but anyways, this song was actually written by Two Brill Building Veterans Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller and originally recorded by a African American group the Clovers and their version contained an alternate lyric at the end "I had so much fun that I'll go do it again I wonder what wil happen with Potion Number 10" and whether or not Lieber and Stoller made this story up or if it was based off of anything real I don't know, but chances are the story was completely fictional and untrue. but regardless, the group that recorded this was a British group that was just on the heels of the Beatles in America and were the second british group to have hits in America after the Beatles along with Dusty Springfield. and they consisted of Mike Pinder, Tony Jackson, Chris Curtis and John McNally. they were signed to Pye records and were produced by the same guy that produced Petula Clark, Tony Hatch.

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